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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
heidi, the environment clearly a global challenge, clearly a part of the foreign policy. how does it fit into the economic statecraft? >> it fits into a lot of different things the state department is working on. what we as a relatively new office of seven months and only a few people have been working on are much more than the sort of geographic priorities that the secretary has highlighted, so i probably wouldn't be the best person to speak to this department with a whole host of environmental issues. a lot more time on the year autozone and the relationship and then there's a little bit of a list from the economic analysis perspective that we tend to spend most of our time on. >> all of the subjects but maybe everybody else would like a chance to do that, too. questions? i think there is a microphone here. is there another mic? going once -- if people don't have questions i will ask them. okay. >> the council of the land that. one of the things that we observed both in the atlanta environment and looking at the global companies that has to do with our competitive edge advantage in col
's unacceptable in today's environment. >> schieffer: do you have any answers yet as to why-- we know that they had asked to maintain their-- the current level of security and that was turned down. do we have any idea on what that decision was based on? >> no, and we're still getting to the bottom of that. that's one of my primary concerns. and that's certainly what i'm driving. first of all, why there was failure for adequate security at the temporary mission. and secondly, why they didn't assess the security risks posed to that facility? they had abundance of threat reports and incidents, both to that facility and other consulates that would have suggested that they were in a high-threat environment. i sponsored-- i cosponsored the initial legislation-- i was the lead republican in the house-- to create the diplomat security bureau and the accountability review board that also has been initiate so we can get to the bottom of who is responsible. there was minimal security. the barriers weren't sufficient. the attackers, the mob, overran the complex. the militia we were depending on d
with training, and you have to create an environment where you understand that is going to happen and it is not necessarily a career injured. we are working on it. it is absolutely essential that we do. when i came in, we notice that 70's are of our public diplomacy dollars were spent on a demographic over the age of 35. we said looking at the world, the fact is that you have a far better opportunity of planting the seeds with a younger demographic which is what i was so supportive of the program. he said it is so it difficult when you wreach those. when you're younger you have an ability to do that. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan she will be able to change the perception of the united states in a way that we never could. it is the wisest testament not just for the future but for whitright now. >> we have a clash of technology in future. it is going to play out. she came across this egypt influenced network. if you google it, it is this blob of blue, red, purple circles. to the blue are people tweeted in english. the right people in arabic. the pu
impacts on you. this is whole different environment and we can not let the republicans say, hey, if we could just hide this. i don't want to hear how you hide your views. i want to hear how you change your views. >> picking up on that, ann, did you see that in your research, when the message developments reach out to women you had to integrate these ideas of social and economic messages that they are part of a basket of issues that affect women's lives? >> they were part of a basket. i think what is important when we were targeting these independent voters in battleground states, these women were reacting very much to the same messages that most voters were reacting to. i think, when we're talking getting more women into the pipeline, we want to go back to the, i think the big story of this campaign, and recruiting and getting more women involved and sort of really waking up to that independent female voter votes who is becoming more conscious of these issues but also thinking of possibly running and which party they might align with. one of the things when you talk to women candidates
, very careful. i never remove a document, even when i'm in a secured environment, i make sure that -- sometimes i don't even bring in my briefcase so i don't make a mistake. it's a very carefully constructed environment. if she has such material on her computer, it raises possible federal criminal issues. now, i have to tell you that this city is awash with documents that are still marked secret but really are not. and people become very casual. and it is possible that she could have gotten this material from people around general petraeus. that's part of the problem with having this type of relationship is that the general clearly wants her to be around, clearly favors her, and the subordinates may have lost some perspective. and helped her a little too much. >> let's move on to general allen. the fbi is not investigating him, the military is. what charges could he face? >> now, he faces a very straightforward article 134 on adultery if, in fact, he had an adulterous relationship. as a commander, he often has to mete out punishment to people who had conduct unbecoming an offi
things, to create a nice environment for them to enjoy and the group that came out to cover this said we expected you to be an a-hole. we expected you to be upset down and backwards with granting access to us. and i went, this is who i am. >> are you a nice guy? >> he's a very nice guy. >> this is not who you see. there's always that busch brother problem. baldwin brother problem. >> don't put me in that group. >> seriously, are you a nice guy who is just misunderstood? >> i have a fiery attitude when i put the helmet on. it's just that mentality of when you go into battle and you're a sports guy, you have to do what it takes to win. sometimes it rubs people the wrong way. especially the fabric of the way everything hases viewed these days has to be so clean, crisp cut and you can't have any blemishes. coach bobby knight is a guy i looked up to, tossing chairs, that's how my dad taught me. >> i love how you drive, first of all. watching this documentary, i was struck by how much you seem to mistrust and not like the media. i don't know if it's just specific in nascar. >> we're nice. >> o
-secure environment. and we did 62 billion in the rack. if you have not had a chance to read the final assessment that occured in iraq, it is heartbreaking. the facilities that are standing empty, to say nothing of all the things that we built with those taxpayer dollars that were blown up, to say nothing of the projects that are in ruin because, frankly, an inability to maintain or sustain what we built. we are about ready to have a report like that, i believe, in afghanistan. i cannot get anyone to give me any datapoint that supports the notion that the department of the defense and even the state department, undergoing massive infrastructure projects, while we're trying to train an army, establish a police force and a rule of law, have contributed to our success. i would like your comments on that. >> i recognize an important part of my responsibilities will be to be a good steward of our resources. we discussed this issue with general allan. he has begun to review every single project to make sure it has achieved the desired effect. he has also canceled millions of dollars of projects that di
, as does my environment just by nature. so the book is very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth and how over time it changes. the same substance -- stone, rock, water, wood -- go from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat. and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality all the way from childhood where we're immortal to our elder years where we become the thing that holds so many people we've lost and is what survives. memory is what survives. and within that memory the afterlife of so much. so thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago, i certainly did not expect i would end up here or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think what we've heard so far is that a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never have been an outpost? what's the context within my own war experience? who was i before i went
environment it would not, but the problem, january 200816 bucks, and january 2012, 41 bucks. i would not pile into it, but i like the risk-reward here. it's a relatively safe place, but the economic backdrop continues to serve them well. they opened a 111 stores in the last quarter alope. cheryl: competition in feasm dollar as well, other retailers. >> family dollar, dollar general, performing better. i have the comparable -- all trading at 14, pe, same book value, everything of the this is the one that's probably oversold, perhaps -- i will tell you this to your point, 35 # as a stop, has room to go to 44, and from there we'll reassess it. dennis: 39 today and up 3% today. all right. cheryl: making money with charles. dennis: tough twinkie talk threatening to liquidate unless the strikers return to be tonig. cheryl: how the currencies fare against the dollar. interesting times now in europe. as you can see, the year -- euro a little bit weaker against the dollar. we'll be right back. cheryl: ceo of chrysler announcing a major plan to add investments at three major plants. one is jeff locke,
sorts of things. but also along with training them, you have to create an institution and environment were you see guys going to happen and it's not necessarily a career ender when it happened. but we are working on it and i think we've gotten better because it's absolutely essential that we do. briefly in the demographics, one of the things i noticed was about 70% are public diplomacy dollars were spent if you do it demographically on an over the age we flipped out because looking at the world and the way it is, the fact of the matter is you have a far better opportunity employment being a planting seeds of the younger demographic, paul said it is difficult when someone reaches 40, 50, 62 change their perception of their ideas. when they are younger you have an ability to do it. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan, 15 or 16 years old, she will be able to change the perception of the united states and her family and her community and away we never could. so it's a wise estimate, not just for the future, but frankly for right now. >> so with a clash of tech
the environment is bad for the environment, beavers form wetlands other species could move into. he's important. >> what else does he eat besides bananas? >> vegetation and he likes to eat tree bark. he has teeth on them that are so much enamel that are bright orange. these guys chop down trees and build dams with them. >> you don't want to get in front of an angry beaver. >> bring out the owl. >> let me put the baby alligator away. the last animal is another species that would have been -- >> what are they called? >> barn owl. these are a species native to europe. european colonists would have been used to seeing these guys. these animals can find prey in pitch darkness. >> you're kidding. >> tests have been done on these species, they've removed every iota of light. they are called barn owls, because they are one of the few species that can live in human structures and benefit from our building. >> is that okay on your hand, looks like he's breaking skin. >> this is the first time you haven't been pooped on or bleeding. the turkey did enough for everybody. thank you so much, dave. >> thank yo
genes protect you in the environment. >> ways to survive the holiday season. fight for sleep and stay one-handed. >> have one hand free to shake hands so get to drink with the other hand or eat with the other but no two-fisted eating or drinking. >> the quiz? >> want to pay off the quiz. >> what are the three words? >> i remember the three words. >> what are they? >> stuffing, tree and snow. i was also about to cheat and scribble them down. i didn't. i'm very proud of myself. what's your name again? >> dr. mehmet oz. thank you very much. happy holidays. >> happy holidays. >>> just ahead what, justin bieber is saying about the reported split with longtime girlfriend selena gomez and fear the dragon baby. we'll meet the father and son behind the wildly popular online video right after this. into their work, their name on the door, and their heart into their community. small business saturday is a day to show our support. a day to shop at stores owned by our friends and neighbors. and do our part for the businesses that do so much for us. on november 24th, let's get out and shop small. h
the journal on what improvements we see by putting teenagers in this environment. it will be printed next year. what we're seeing is a 10-15% improvement on survival rates. we're not dealing with medicine, just environment. if you had a drug that will give you 10-15% improvement on your outcome, they would throw billions at you. >> you cannot really argue with that. it sounds like a great plan. was there someone specifically? how did you become interested in teenage cancer? how did you notice there was a gap in this? >> as i said earlier, i noticed basically because my doctor and his wife noticed. i just have one of those brains that seem to me straight line, sensible things to do. there is a huge problem in madison of the moment. costs are going through the roof. there are other things you can do to improve the care of the patient. the one role of medicine that is observation of pedicethe patien. basically from the beginning when it was posed to me as a problem. >> when it was announced you were speaking here we did get questions from the general public, and some came from young adult teenage
examines how the u.s. can be economically competitive in a global environment. >> later today british prime minister david cameron delivers his keynote address on policy at the lord mayor's banquet in london. the event is attended by members of the city's financial and diplomatic corps. you can see his remarks live at 3:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. and i'm proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that insures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly-elected congress starts work in january, but the current congress still has work to do through the end of the
are being formed today in an environment that's much, much more radical than was the case nearly a decade earlier. i think there are some important lessons that the u.s. can learn from iraq and from afghanistan and from what's taking place there. but again the thing i would take away and the thing i would really stress to people is that this is not a war that the u.s. can win on its own. it's very -- it's very tempting for the u.s. to see a problem and to want to go in and solve it all the way. and i think there has to be a realization that sometimes being so pro active and carrying out so -- proactive and carrying out so many missile strikes and drone strikes can actually have a negative impact. >> ibrahim, did you want to chime in on this one? >> well, i didn't hear the question. i have a hard time hearing from the audience. but what greg said made sense to me so thank you. [laughter] >> i'm sorry. i'll start repeating the question to make sure we can get it. >> thank you. >> in the back. >> thank you. good morning. my name is giancarlo gonzalez with talk radio service. yemeni president
investment is going to follow countries that have a more competitive environment in taxes is one of them's a we have to reform the tax code and when you do that you will get more revenue. it's guaranteed. again, as i was talking at earlier there are opportunities here for us as a country and if you look at the congressional budget analysts this and go to the tax committee analysis what tax reform could mean in the economic growth and all of them will lead to more growth with this corporate tax reform. estimate of the president says what he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and we fought over rising tax rates. jay carney said they would veto any bill that extends the current tax rate so if he insists that tax rates go out for those making over to under $50,000 will would your recommendation before the conference in the senate? >> working in to white house is i believe a president does have a veto because i like the president's comments better than jay carney's comments. i think jay carney mabey was a little behind the curve on that because look, it makes no sense to ta
document. the job of government is to provide an environment in which our citizens can live their lives knowing that they will not be subject to nefarious actions by others. in the case of the farmers and ranchers, the terrible stories, thousands of stories like this that the chairman described. there was a failure of government to protect these people, and the results of this investigation, fulfilling congress' obligation to oversight, tell us we have many opportunities to improve and provide better protection, and these opportunities run the gamut from following the behavior of those who are in charge at entities like mf global to monitoring and modifying the ways in which the rating agencies do their business, do their job. there have been so many failures in so many ways, not only at an f global, but at other similar stories in recent history. one common strand seems to be that we need to provide our regulators with better tools to pursue the enforcement of law that existed prior to the massive imposition of dot-franc pit which did not have infinite resources and united states, nor
whether we have to compete. you have to benchmark what your tax environment, your regulatory environment, your energy costs. the good news is in terms of getting manufacturing, we're still the world's largest market. when global investors take a look at the u.s., and canada's rate is 15% and hours is 35%, where are you going to site your plant? $1.75 trillion a year, a number that is larger than all but 80 economies in the world. it is not particularly attractive. when this administration refuses to utilize our domestic energy resources, refuses the keystone pipeline which would bring jobs and energy down to america, they reject that. that is not attractive in terms of global investment and job creation. the caller also talked about what caused the deficit then been a lot of charts and graphs dispel some myths. over four years, the total deficit was 5000 $92 billion. the taxes on the wealthy over that same time was $136 billion. all other americans was $544 billion. total cost of the bush tax cuts and the wars was about $1.30 trillion which means 75% of the deficit was caused by other sp
, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-511-3035 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ zimplt this is the cnn newsroom. we're continuing our special coverage right now. the president's first news conference since being re-elected. i'm wolf blitzer in washington. i'm joibd by our league suzanne malveaux. these shooes at the cnn center in tlapt. our gloria borger, our donna brazil and alex, our national security credibilitior fran townsend, also a member of the
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)